Homework Social Story

Homework Social Story-40
Teachers are afraid not to give homework for fear of being perceived as "easy." Despite there being more diversity among learners in our schools than ever, many teachers continue to assign the same homework to all students in the class and continue to disproportionately fail students from lower-income households for not doing homework, in essence punishing them for lack of an adequate environment in which to do homework.At a time when demand for accountability has reached a new high, research fails to prove that homework is worth all that trouble.In 1900, the editor of the Ladies' Home Journal, Edward Bok, began a series of anti-homework articles.

Homework was blamed for nervous conditions in children, eyestrain, stress, lack of sleep, and other conditions.

Homework was viewed as a culprit that robbed children of important opportunities for social interaction.

The benefits of fresh air, sunshine, and exercise for children were widely accepted, and homework had the potential to interfere.

One hundred years ago, rather than diagnosing children with attention deficit disorder, pediatricians simply prescribed more outdoor exercise.

His writings were instrumental in the growth of the anti-homework movement of the early 1900s, a harbinger of the important role media would play in future homework debates.

By 1930, the anti-homework sentiment had grown so strong that a Society for the Abolition of Homework was formed.Teachers, overwhelmed by an already glutted curriculum and pressures related to standardized tests, assign homework in an attempt to develop students' skills and extend learning time.At the same time, they are left frustrated when the students who most need more time to learn seem the least likely to complete homework.There's a growing suspicion that something is wrong with homework.This more critical view represents a movement away from the pro-homework attitudes that have been consistent for decades (Kralovec & Buell, 2000).Simple tasks of memorization and practice were easy for children to do at home, and the belief was that such mental exercise disciplined the mind. schools has evolved from the once simple tasks of memorizing math facts or writing spelling words to complex projects.Homework has generally been viewed as a positive practice and accepted without question as part of the student routine. As the culture has changed, and as schools and families have changed, homework has become problematic for more and more students, parents, and teachers.By the 5th grade, many students left school for work; fewer continued to high school (Kralovec & Buell, 2000).In the lower grades, school focused on reading, writing, and arithmetic; in grammar school (grades 5 through 8) and high school, students studied geography, history, literature, and math.At the end of the 19th century, attendance in grades 1 through 4 was irregular for many students, and most classrooms were multi-age.Teachers rarely gave homework to primary students (Gill & Schlossman, 2004).

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