China Book Business Report

China Book Business Report-24
We reported on the Chinese phenomenon of ‘freemium fiction’ back in 2011, and since then the trend has only grown in popularity, with some series racking up in excess of 200 million readers Freemium fiction sites such as work by allowing writers to register for free and write stories in installments of up to 6,000 characters.

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The combination of cheap prices, on online serial format that can be easily read on a mobile phone and escapist content (many online novels have fantasy or wish fulfilment themes) has made freemium fiction enormously popular with 14-21 year olds in China.

Many popular online novels have made the transition into traditional publishing – hence why online writers have graduated to the official China Writers Rich List.

This week The London Book Fair is taking a tour of the publishing industry around the world with its Virtual Conference Around The World in 8 Hours.

The conference begins in China with a Virtual keynote to delegates, setting out the market and opportunities for book publishers in the world’s fastest growing consumer economy – China.

The opportunity is huge but, once again, price is a key driver.

Online bookstores in China typically offer books at a 30-40% discount on the retail price.We’re participating in the Virtual Conference with this post – the Top Five Trends that are transforming the book business in China.To get involved with the conference on the day, keep an eye on the hashtag #pdmc15 or follow London Book Fair on Twitter.This means that any company looking to capture a slice of the Chinese digital reading market needs to target mobile phones.One early entrant into this market was China Mobile, one of China’s biggest mobile carriers.In Mandarin the character for ‘book’ is a homonym (sounds the same as) of the character for ‘cheap’. In China books are cheap, and this is especially so in the case of ebooks.The typical selling price of an ebook in China tops out at around 8 Yuan(around

Online bookstores in China typically offer books at a 30-40% discount on the retail price.

We’re participating in the Virtual Conference with this post – the Top Five Trends that are transforming the book business in China.

To get involved with the conference on the day, keep an eye on the hashtag #pdmc15 or follow London Book Fair on Twitter.

This means that any company looking to capture a slice of the Chinese digital reading market needs to target mobile phones.

One early entrant into this market was China Mobile, one of China’s biggest mobile carriers.

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Online bookstores in China typically offer books at a 30-40% discount on the retail price.We’re participating in the Virtual Conference with this post – the Top Five Trends that are transforming the book business in China.To get involved with the conference on the day, keep an eye on the hashtag #pdmc15 or follow London Book Fair on Twitter.This means that any company looking to capture a slice of the Chinese digital reading market needs to target mobile phones.One early entrant into this market was China Mobile, one of China’s biggest mobile carriers.In Mandarin the character for ‘book’ is a homonym (sounds the same as) of the character for ‘cheap’. In China books are cheap, and this is especially so in the case of ebooks.The typical selling price of an ebook in China tops out at around 8 Yuan(around $1.30), putting books in the same price range as basic grocery items as rice or potatoes.Before the government will issue an ISBN, the book must be officially approved.Online publishing (rather than self-publishing) therefore acts as a workaround for these approval rules.China is an example of what is often called a ‘mobile-first’ economy, meaning that many consumers primarily use their phones to access the internet.One estimate by Boston Consulting Group suggest that as much as 90% of internet browsing in China is conducted on smartphones.

.30), putting books in the same price range as basic grocery items as rice or potatoes.Before the government will issue an ISBN, the book must be officially approved.Online publishing (rather than self-publishing) therefore acts as a workaround for these approval rules.China is an example of what is often called a ‘mobile-first’ economy, meaning that many consumers primarily use their phones to access the internet.One estimate by Boston Consulting Group suggest that as much as 90% of internet browsing in China is conducted on smartphones.

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